School-2

Designing a Collaborative Classroom

Is there a more necessary skill in today’s workforce than the ability to collaborate? It doesn’t appear to be so, with over 80 percent of white-collar workers claiming collaboration as a necessary part of their job.

It’s no wonder then, why educators are seeking out ways to create more collaborative classrooms. Because what better way to empower our children than by teaching them the skills they’ll need to contribute and thrive once they exit the school system and enter the workforce?

CDI-EcoleChampsVallee-15

The Best Activity Tables for Your Learning Environment

Furnishing a classroom isn’t just about tables and chairs. As most educators are already aware, there are numerous factors to consider – each impacting a student’s education in ways that may not be initially obvious.

Of course, quality, price, and durability are essential in the decision-making process, but what about the implications each piece of furniture has on a child’s learning?

CDI-EcoleChampsVallee-3

Seven Things to Consider Before Buying School Furniture

There’s a Chinese proverb, which says, “Do not confine your children to your own learning, for they were born in another time.”

This aphorism is likely more true of today’s children than of any previous generation. Thanks in large part to rapid technological growth, the modern child (and the modern classroom) bears little resemblance to the past.

While traditional teaching consisted of the “stand and teach/sit still and listen” format, today’s teachers understand this isn’t ideal. Instead, educators must work harder to engage students in active learning, knowing that people learn best by doing.

CDI-istock-1920-21

Why Well-Designed Learning Spaces Pay Educational Dividends

So much of the attention surrounding education focuses on how teachers teach, and for obvious reasons. It’s a teacher’s job to impart information to a classroom filled with unique individuals, each learning in different ways, for a variety of reasons. However, we’re learning that in order to develop successful, well-educated students who thrive outside the classroom, there’s more to consider than how we teach. As it turns out, the actual design of the physical learning space matters just as much as the method of teaching does.